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Upcoming Webinars

CTTC presents a webinar series available for both CTTC members and non-members, on a variety of topics related to the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant and cell therapy. 

CTTC Member Pricing: FREE access to all webinars in the 2020 Webinar Series
Non-Member Pricing: $90 + GST per webinar


To promote the CTTC 2020 Webinar Series in your centre, please download the CTTC 2020 Webinar Series poster.
 

The University of British Columbia Division of Continuing Professional Development (UBC CPD) is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Continuing Medical Education (CACME) to provide study credits for continuing medical education for physicians.  This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification Program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and has been approved by UBC CPD for up to 8.0 MOC Section 1 Group Learning credits.Each physician should claim only those credits he/she actually spent in the activity.


 

2020 Webinar Series


April 8, 2020
12:00pm PT/3:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0

Assessment of Comorbidities for Hematopoietic Cell Transplants: Achievements and Controversies

Mahmoud Elsawy, MD, MSc (Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS)

Brief Biography:
Dr. Elsawy is an Assistant Professor of Hematology, Dalhousie University, Canada and Affiliate Investigator at Fred Hutch, Seattle. He graduated from Cairo University School of Medicine, Egypt in 2007. He finished his Medicine and Hematology/Oncology training at the National Cancer Institute of Egypt. Following this, he was awarded a scholarship to join Fred Hutch/ University of Washington, Seattle between 2013 and 2016 for a postdoctoral fellowship in Stem cell Transplantation under the mentorship of Dr. Mohamed Sorror. His research focus was around the impact of comorbidities on outcomes of transplant recipients, treatment of AML in the elderly population, and survivorship following BMT. He then joined the Leukemia and Bone Marrow Transplant Program in Vancouver, BC where he completed a clinical fellowship between 2016 and 2018. He joined the BMT Program at Dalhousie University as an Assistant Professor of Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation in 2018 where he currently focuses on optimization of pre-transplant comorbidities to improve post-transplantation outcomes in the elderly population and on long term follow up and management of chronic graft versus host disease where he established a LTFU clinic for transplant survivors. Additionally, he has special interests in management of myeloid malignancies in older adults and in providing CAR T-cell therapy. Dr. Elsawy is the Lead for establishing a future regional CAR T-cell Therapy Program in Halifax. 

Synopsis:
Allogeneic conventional HCT (hematopoietic cell transplantation) is a potentially curative therapy for many patients with hematologic malignant or nonmalignant diseases. Historically, conditioning regimens for conventional HCT have been intensified to the limits of organ tolerance in order to optimize cancer eradication. Consequently, serious toxicities to organs, such as gut, lung, kidney, heart, and liver, have been observed which, additionally, have limited the ability to deliver adequate doses of postgrafting immunosuppression needed for control of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The use of reduced intensity regimens has expanded the use of HCT to include elderly and comorbid patients with various hematologic malignancies. Therefore, it has become important to comprehensive study differences in comorbidities among patient groups, to investigate the impacts of comorbidities on HCT outcomes and quality of life, and to standardize comorbidity assessment for future clinical trials.

Learning Objectives:
1. Describing the milestones of evolution of comorbidities research in HCT
2. Highlighting the relevance of comprehensive comorbidities assessment
3. Reviewing the utilization of Hematopoietic cell transplantation specific- comorbidity index (HCT-CI)
4. Assessing strengths and weaknesses of the HCT-CI with a focus on methodology for calculating the HCT-CI score
5. Thoughts for the future

This webinar is sponsored by an unrestricted education grant from 


April 22, 2020
9:00am PT/12:00pm ET

Title TBA

Arjun Law, MD (Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON)



This webinar is sponsored by 


May 27, 2020
12:00pm PT/3:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0

Neurotoxicity Post CAR-T Cell Therapy

Bianca Santomasso, MD (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY)
 

Learning Objectives:
TBA

 


June 17, 2020
9:00am PT/12:00pm ET

CAR-T from Clinical Trials to Standard of Care: What Have We Learned?

 

This webinar is sponsored by  


July 15, 2020
9:00am PT/12:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0


Cellular Therapy Product Manufacturing and Testing - Current Techniques

A behind the scenes look at cellular therapy processing for the entire transplant team


Mike Halpenny
MLT (Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, ON)

Speaker Biography:
Mike Halpenny has been working in the cellular therapy field for over 25 years, starting his career in a research setting and progressing to working in a regulated manufacturing environment.  In 2010, Mike was recruited to oversee the design, development, validation and implementation of the manufacturing process for the Canadian Blood Services’ Cord Blood Bank.  He is currently the Manager, Manufacturing, Cord Blood Bank and Stem Cell Manufacturing at Canadian Blood Services.
Mike is a registered Medical Laboratory Technologist (CMLTO, Canadian Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario), has completed a certificate in Quality Management for Healthcare Professionals from the Canadian Healthcare Association and has been a FACT inspector since 2000.

Learning Objectives: 
1. Provide an overview of current processing methods and testing techniques for cellular therapy products, including cord blood, HPC, Apheresis and bone marrow.
2. Introduction to novel or advanced cell products, including CAR-T, and the role of the minimal manipulation laboratory with these new products


August 26, 2020
9:00am PT/12:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0

TCR T Cells, WT-1 T Cells and HA-1 TCR T Cells

Elizabeth Krakow, MD & Aude Chapuis, MD (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA)

 

Brief Biographies:
Dr. Elizabeth Krakow completed her hematology training at McMaster University and a fellowship in hematopoietic cell transplantation at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont in Montreal. She is an attending physician at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and clinical researcher at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She takes care of adult BMT patients in all phases of transplantation and post-transplant recovery. She leads translational trials of novel cellular immunotherapies to treat post-transplant leukemia relapse.

Dr. Aude Chapuis is an expert in adoptive T-cell immunotherapies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. She received her medical and research training in Switzerland and completed her postdoctoral training and oncology fellowship in Seattle, at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington, where she is now a faculty member. 

Dr. Chapuis and her team are expert at identifying and validating optimal high-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs), engineering T cells with specific TCR genes, preparing certified T cell products for clinical trials and assessing their function in patients. Ongoing studies aim to 1) improve the survival and intrinsic antitumor activity of transferred T cells and 2) modulate cells in tumor “microenvironments” to improve therapeutic T cell activity. She has prepared and maintained successful investigator-initiated Investigational New Drug applications for the U.S. F.D.A., and written and served as the Principal Investigator of numerous adoptive immunotherapy trials.

Synopsis:

T cells can be engineered with particular T cell receptor (TCR) molecules that bind pieces of specific proteins (antigens) and thereby direct T cells to attack cells expressing those antigens. In this webinar, researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will discuss their recent and ongoing clinical trials of WT-1 and HA-1 specific TCR T cells to prevent and treat post-transplant leukemia relapse. They will review the clinical results and progress of these trials, discuss different approaches to generating antigen-specific T cells including expansion of naturally-occurring T cell clones vs. genetic engineering, elaborate on the factors associated with successful transfer of immune TCR T cells, and describe methods that may improve TCR T cell survival, proliferation and anti-tumor activity of infused T cells. 

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe how TCR T cell differ from CAR-T cells
2. Familiarize participants with strategies for finding TCR targets and high-affinity, highly specific TCRs and for manufacturing TCR T cells
3. Share clinical results of TCR T cell trials to prevent and treatment post-transplant leukemia/MDS relapse

 




September 16, 2020
9:00am PT/12:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0

Poverty Matters:  How Income Impacts Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

Kristjan Paulson, MD (University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB)

Learning Objectives:

TBA

 


October 14, 2020
9:00am PT/12:00pm ET

Title TBA

This webinar is sponsored by 


October 28, 2020
12:00pm PT/3:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0
 

The Role of Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Myeloma in 2020

Donna Reece, MD (Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON)

Learning Objectives:
1.     To understand the role of ASCT in the era of newer anti-myeloma treatments, including immunotherapy.
2.     To discuss the use of post-ASCT treatment, with a focus on options for maintenance therapy.
3.     To review strategies for improving the outcome of ASCT in high-risk myeloma patients.

 



November 25, 2020
12:00pm PT/3:00pm ET
CME Credit Hours: 1.0

Engineered Immune Effector Cells for Hematologic Malignancies

Kevin Hay, MD, MSc, FRCPC (BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC)
 
Learning Objectives:
TBA


 

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